Let’s Get Specific

Let’s Get Specific is a little essay written by Beth Johnson that describes the benefits of utilizing concrete details. Personally, I think concrete details are a vital source to any essay. It allows the author to have more meaning to their topic and it gets the point across to the reader more easily.

For example, Beth Johnson included sample essays that college students wrote. The topic was simple, “Living at home as a college student.” The first essay was from a college student that specifically lived at home and they simply told their experience living at home compared to living in a college apartment or dorm. However, there were no quotes that provide concrete details. It was very boring to read and honestly, I couldn’t trust the fact that they actually lived at home because there was no concrete details to prove it. It was much less relatable compared to the second essay.

The second essay was also by another college student that lives at home. This time quotes are featured within the essay itself. This makes the essay more emursive because the reader can experience what is actually going on. In this case, the author is trying to explain the fact that a college student like him can’t go from place to place without parents bugging in or having a friend over. The quotes perfectly showcase those situations without needing any further explanation. Everything was specific and one can trust the author’s words because it is a first hand account of living at home as a college student due to the concrete details. The concrete details allows the writing to be more interesting and more relatable compared to the first essay as Johnson described.

In the end, including concrete details makes one’s writing more descriptive and more engaging for the reader. It just makes anybody’s writing better overall, and there shouldn’t be an excuse for not using something that benefits one so greatly.

Photo by Dean Hochman CC BY 2.0

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